FAQ GALLERY
CONNECTIVITY
C.O.R.E

(COMBINED ORDERING RETAIL ECOSYSTEM)

SUPERNAP provides the most unique technology communications gateway hub in the world. Originally a telco arbitrage fiber engine created by Enron, SUPERNAP Founder and CEO Rob Roy saw a greater vision for this one-of-a-kind asset and acquired the facility in 2002. Today, with 50+ carriers on-net and 4,000+ fibers, the SUPERNAP team puts the collective buying power of our facilities to work for clients by offering unprecedented wholesale pricing through its $3 trillion carrier-agnostic purchasing consortium called C.O.R.E

PROVIDERS
C.O.R.E DELIVERS UNPRECEDENTED
CARRIER CHOICE
A multidute of carrier connections in data center cloud operating system.

With 50+ on-net carriers, the SUPERNAP Network Team effectively assesses telecommunications service options to over 500,000 global addresses.  Our longstanding carrier relationships, $3 trillion wholesale buying consortium, and multi-carrier on-net global footprint creates a one of a kind value proposition.

 

The SUPERNAPs are network agnostic and provide clients with access to the world’s most powerful technology ecosystem and telecommunications buying power.

BUYING POWER
COMBINED NETWORK PURCHASING POWER
FOR MORE THAN
1000 CLIENTS
Return on investment in cloud services.

SUPERNAP offers clients pricing that is below wholesale telco costs through the nearly $3 trillion in collective buying power of the Switch C.O.R.E (Combined Ordering Retail Ecosystem).

 

C.O.R.E aggregates the collective buying power of over 1000 client partners to create the single largest telco buying entity in the world.

BANDWIDTH SOLUTIONS
SWITCH C.O.R.E OFFERS GLOBAL CONNECTIVITY OPTIONS
Global connectivity options.

The network economies of scale created by C.O.R.E are unmatched. No single enterprise in the world has the buying power of the combined groups that exist today in the SUPERNAP ecosystem. SUPERNAP offers global connectivity options with unsurpassed pricing, bandwidth scalability and carrier choice.

 

  50+ On-net providers

  Global coverage

  Services include:

Transport (Metro & IXC)

Internet

MPLS

Voice (TDM & VOIP)

  Capacity:

Ethernet (10Mbps to 100Gbps)

Sonet (T1 to OC192)

 

NETWORK SOLUTIONS
INTERNET ROUTING PROTOCOL OPTIONS

The following diagrams illustrate the core SUPERNAP network and how traffic flows across the network backbone. The diagrams also provide examples of current customer setups including Hot Standby Routing Protocol (HSRP).

Core Network:

SUPERNAP currently operates 8 NAP-IX data centers. All data centers are connected diversely and redundantly by Switch owned fiber. Every data center has multiple pathways to the other data centers to take advantage of a broad blend of five Internet transit providers. This design succeeds in being dynamic, robust, and diverse.

 

Customers who colocate in one of the SUPERNAP data centers are provided a number of different options for internet connectivity. These range from single drops, to multiple redundant drops. Redundancy to the customer is provided either by BGP (Border Gateway Protocol) or HSRP (Hot Standby Routing Protocol).

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Core network.

BGP A:

 

Example Customer Setup

 

BGP, Border Gateway Protocol, is currently the most appropriate routing protocol to be placed between different systems. In this example a firm demarcation is created between the systems while avoiding a single point of failure. Only a handful of routes need be exchanged between the systems keeping complexity at a minimum.

HSRP A:

 

Example Customer Setup

 

HSRP, Hot Standby Routing Protocol, is a mechanism to provide a redundant gateway for connected devices. In this example, the redundant gateway is provided to all servers. This example still contains a single point of failure in the customer switch. Failure of this device will render the HSRP gateway inaccessible.

HSRP B:

 

Example Customer Setup

 

A seemingly small but important distinction from example A, a router is placed behind the switch. This is an improvement as a demarcation is declared between the two systems.

HSRP Example B.

HSRP C:

 

Example Customer Setup

 

This example eliminates a single point of failure and promotes the greatest possible uptime. Additionally, HSRP, or equivalent, can be run across the switches from the customer routers to provide a redundant destination for Switch to route to.

HSRP Example C.
Switch - SUPERNAP Data Centers.
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